Theatre Collective and Punk Activists: The Hungry Bitches

Theatre Collective and Punk Activists: The Hungry Bitches

Hungry Bitch Productions is more than a theatre collective. It is an iconoclastic cult for queers, freaks and artists. Need more be said? With a nod of irony and the ability to laugh at and love themselves, these self-proclaimed wannabes are ambitious, yet grounded. They live and breathe punk and misbehave all in the name of the kind of social delinquency that subverts an art-form as traditional as theatre, shaking it to its core to make it as cool and as relevant as ever.

The Hungry Bitches themselves are from the same hometown, Liverpool, as Junior Editor Michelle Houlston, and found time in their busy schedules to catch up over a few emails. The respective heart, soul and brains behind the collective – Graham Mercer (Gez Mez), Matthew Reynolds and Conway McDermott – talk about their influences, intersectionality, anger, and why you shouldn’t let that teenage fire burn out.

شركات ومكاتب الاستثمار في الذهب في قطر Michelle Houlston: You create pop art punk musicals, but who are the Hungry Bitches? And how did it all begin?

The Hungry Bitches: It started when we were teenagers. We formed a Riot Grrrl punk band, ‘The Hungry Bitches’, in Gez Mez’s hot pink bedroom. We had hair the size of America and an overdose of bruised Brody Dalle eye makeup. Now we produce political, irreverent, queer, aggressive, avant-garde musical theatre. It’s musical theatre made for people who don’t like musical theatre. We believe there is a Hungry Bitch in every خيار ثنائي بوت السيارات  starvin’ artist out there, and want our audience to claim the title for themselves too.

أفضل وسيط للفوركس MH: You write and create characters that embody social delinquency, like Americana’s punk misfit, Peaches, and gay stoner, David. Tell us more. What is the reasoning behind it? And what is the message in the rise of the underdog?

HB: The characters in بنك الاهلي الاسهم Americana are part autobiographical and part teenage superhero. We write and create these characters because we write what we know. In school, we weren’t exactly the popular kids. We were more like an obnoxious teenage Courtney Love, wishing we were cool enough to smoke behind the bike sheds. With theatre, we have an opportunity to create the teenagers we wanted to be and hang out with. For us, it became cathartic. Putting these punky teenage underdogs into the world of رخصة خيار ثنائي Americana is like going back into our past and rewriting our teenage history. We wish we had been more, “FUCK YOU!” and did not take half the shit we took in school. This is what we want to inspire our audience to do – to fight, to be strong, to not take shit from bigoted normative assholes. Be a gangster.

الخيارات الثنائية دورة دراسية المنزل MH: Not only do your characters allow us an insight into the unique way the Hungry Bitches like to do things, but there is a nod to revolution in the way you incorporate music. Of course, rock music has been heard in musical theatre before, so why merge punk with theatre?

HB: Punk runs so deeply within us – we aren’t necessarily even فوركس توصيات choosing to write rock musicals. It is what we have always done since we were fifteen and first picked up guitars. We would play fabulously bad cover versions of Distillers songs. The theatre came afterwards. We didn’t really know what we wanted to do, other than to make art in some capacity.

When we went to study in Leeds, it was a real culture clash for us, coming as working class kids from Liverpool, to being surrounded by half the cast of التوصيات المجانية للاسهم السعودية Made in Chelsea. We didn’t connect with the general student mentality at the University of Leeds, so we made our first show, افضل مؤشرات الفوركس Middle-Class Filth, as a response and essentially to piss people off. It was about Dominatrixes and Satanists in Surrey. Hundreds of people showed up and couldn’t get in. Loads of people walked out because it was too shocking for them. I can’t believe we let our parents come and see that show. It was punk as fuck.

Performance, theatre, punk; they are all political landscapes. And somewhere between these three, we found our playground. We have always said, the simplest way to describe the message we want to communicate is in two words: fuck off! We’d say that’s social delinquency. It’s as true now as it was seven years ago. If not more so.

الخيارات الثنائية خدمة ناسخة التجارة MH: As part of your writing, you create sort of slogans – “Sorry not sorry, bitch”, “Be a gangsta”, “You can’t stop progress!” – that are not only witty but are characterising. You have created a Hungry Bitches dialogue that can be consumed and repeated without distorting its originality. How important and thought out is the use of language in your creative process?

HB: The language we use isn’t accidental, but it is at least in part something that’s naturally evolved out of the way we work together. We’re friends, and all close friendship groups develop their own shared language. The “Hungry Bitches dialogue” (which is a fabulous way of putting it, by the way!) really originates from the same place. By letting it out onto the stage and on our social media, we are inviting our audience to take part in it, and take it away with them, when they go.

That being said, there’s more to it than سعر اسهم بنك الاهلي us. In part, because this language isn’t necessarily اسعار الذهب والعملات في السعودية ours. It comes from the internet, from music and youth culture. We filter it through our personal set of influences and our own lyricism, then release it back into the wild. In the context of http://www.riosmartin.com/?bilozir=%D8%B3%D8%B9%D8%B1-%D8%A8%D9%8A%D8%B9-%D8%A7%D8%B3%D9%87%D9%85-%D8%A7%D8%B3%D9%85%D9%86%D8%AA-%D8%A7%D9%85-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%82%D8%B1%D9%89&1e6=92 سعر بيع اسهم اسمنت ام القرى Americana, we were highly conscious that we were doing this. Whilst writing, a large chunk of our influences were high school movies, like تعلم تداول الخيارات الثنائية binary مجاناً وإجني المال الوفير Clueless and http://www.homelesshounds.org.uk/?mikstyra=%D8%B4%D8%B1%D9%8A%D8%B7-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A7%D8%B3%D9%87%D9%85-%D9%84%D9%87%D8%B0%D8%A7-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%8A%D9%88%D9%85&151=f6 شريط الاسهم لهذا اليوم Heathers. If you watch those films, they are brilliantly written and their dialogue isn’t naturalistic at all. They speak in their own highly stylised language and patois, and we have never wanted to shy away from allowing forex nkr Americana the same.

أربح المال بالمال MH: Speaking of language, you have had to put the word “bitches temporarily aside for your educational spin-off project, “The Hunger”. Could you tell us more? Are social delinquents going back to school to teach?

HB: Nah, we’re just going back to smoke behind the bike sheds and shake people down for their lunch money! LOL, joke. Truthfully, though, we feel like we’re going back into schools to respond to a real situation that’s caused by the Tory government. Certain subjects, in particular the arts, have come under attack.  The consequences are not just taking away students’ opportunities to learn about specific subject areas, they are taking away potential and creativity. They are also taking away the analytical tools vital for kids to critique the media or politicians.

Our first piece, ‘Mitosis, Contagion, Radicalization’, is about the spread of white nationalism, and how groups like the BNP and Britain First deliberately target people “like them” for recruitment. They exploit political tensions and spread misinformation over social media. We wanted to avoid talking down to or condescending our audience. Instead, we have attempted to arm them with the information and skills necessary to see through the bullshit and to recognise the power they have to make a difference.

حرة ثنائية الخيارات حاسبة MH: I feel like I could go on and on asking questions, but we do have to leave it somewhere. So to end, what’s next for the Bitches? What are we starving for?

HB: We’re still hustling, and we’re still developing our brand of aggressive pop-culture punk theatre as far as it can go. We’ve spent the last few months continuing to work with Theatre Royal Stratford East on Americana. Normally we’re used to people trying to make us tone ourselves down and compromise, but they never have. The changes we’ve already made to Americana have been bold and exciting, and it’s approaching its final, perfect form. Ready to rise up again at Theatre Royal Stratford East. And after that – the world!

We will be recording new music in the new year, releasing our second music video, and making our third. Then, the action plan of getting Americana from the stage to the silver screen. Those plucky little queer punks have all grown up – and so have our ambitions, our demands, and our work. Hungry? You will be. Join us or die.

 

Written by Michelle Houlston,

New York Junior Editor

Artwork by Becky Currie

 

Hungry BitchesHungry BitchesHungry BitchesHungry BitchesHungry BitchesHungry Bitches