Culture Remix: The Whimsical Nature of Wes Anderson’s “Grand Budapest Hotel.”

Culture Remix: The Whimsical Nature of Wes Anderson’s “Grand Budapest Hotel.”

Culture Remix: The Whimsical Nature of Wes Anderson’s “Grand Budapest Hotel.”

Wes Anderson’s new feature film, “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” is a dizzyingly, charming piece of cinema, layered with pop culture references. Throughout the motion picture, Anderson alludes to the dream like idea of a curiosity shop. Funny when it should be funny and serious when it needs to be, this film is practically perfect in every way. The plot centres around the escapades of Gustave H (Ralph Fiennes), concierge of the famous Grand Budapest Hotel between the wars, and Zero Moustafa, who becomes his loyal friend and most trusted confidante.

                                                    

The use of such stunning cinematography creates a sort of alternate reality when in actual fact the film is set in the 1930’s to the 1960’s. This other-world feeling the viewer is left with , can be attributed to the types of aspect ratios Anderson uses. Aspect ratio, in a nutshell, is an image’s width compared to its height. Due to changes in technology of cinema history, different aspect ratios have been popular at different times. Additionally, the team opted to use natural light whenever possible, and they also employed lots of “practicals” such as chandeliers and lamps. This all helps to create the immersive mood of the story. (For further reading on the technical details of the cinemaography in Grand Budapest Hotel, check out: Inside The Cameras Of Wes Anderson’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel” · NYU Local

Anderson’s highest grossing film to date arguably aligns itself with some of the most popular names in indie cinema today. The creation of such an eclectic yet commercially successful film taps into what the likes of Spike Jonze and Michel Gondry did with films such as “Her” and “The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.”

                                                                              Namely, through really stylized characters that develop into caricatures, the film becomes a piece of escapist magic. For Anderson, the Grand Budapest Hotel marks the graduation from the cult film to the mainstream. I think you could go even further than that to say, this whimsical comedy is one of those rare gems that manages to be both. All in all, a must see for the discerning cinema buff and jolly cinema goer alike, this will truly brighten your week and maybe even remind you of what it means to be happy, silly and care-free something often long forgotten in our contemporary art culture that focusses on darker aspects of human nature.

Text: Lucy Whittaker 

GIFs courtesy of tumblr.