Milo Maria and Peter Jensen's Version of SS/17

Milo Maria and Peter Jensen's Version of SS/17

Having only graduated from Istituto Marangoni in 2013, Miló Maria has already established themselves as a womenswear designer with flair and innovation. Debuting the label’s third collection at the On|Off space within the Vinyl Factory felt like quietly taking in the transcendence of a Pre-Raphaelite painting.

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Milo Maria, SS/17

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Milo Maria, SS/17

However, the vivid naturism of John William Waterhouse and Dante Gabriel Rossetti were replaced by the intergalactic use of metallics, greys and pastels. Silhouettes were loose and draped, adding to the overall cool and calm atmosphere. A sketchy, linear pattern subtly ran through several ensembles and was beautifully juxtaposed by Maria’s use of delicate fabrics.

Alongside gorgeous tailoring shown in two-piece suits (both trousers and shorts), the halter-necked gowns at the centre of the presentation were particularly eye-catching. These statuesque forms glowed exquisitely under the lighting.

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Milo Maria, SS/17

Chiffon silks and crêpes reinforced this celestial, yet ultimately feminine mood underpinning the collection. Known for minimalist elegance, Miló Maria has certainly succeeded in evoking the sensual and otherworldly.

The focus was far more terrestrial and home-grown (quite literally) in the Peter Jensen presentation earlier that day. Pretend you haven’t just hopped off a blisteringly hot and humid train at Charing Cross and entered the labyrinthine staircase of the upper rooms at the ICA. Instead, you are in a luxuriously landscaped garden, somewhere in the depths of an English manor.

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Peter Jensen, SS/17

Here appeared Peter Jensen’s girls as they populated a greenhouse-like structure. This recreation of the flower beds and foliage contrasted nicely with the grand interior of the show space; one that would not look too out of place within the English stately mansion itself.

Bright yellows, forest greens and gingham featured heavily in outfits worn by the clog-wearing models. Inspired by Lady Rhoda Birley, Jensen drew on the eccentric world of aristocracy and how this may be translated through the art of gardening.

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Peter Jensen, SS/17

The vibrant colours, frills and eclectic prints (particularly the sweater featuring two lobsters, another reference to Lady Rhoda, who cared about her roses so much that she made them Lobster Thermidor) are all made complete by patterned scarves and large straw hats. In spite of Jensen’s call to the fash-pack to get more green-fingered, the ensembles and their parts would be just as perfectly worn on the beach, at your gran’s or drinking prosecco by the Thames.

Leaving this intense botanical retreat (the lighting made this particularly literal) I was inspired to start thinking of how best to imbue Lady Rhoda’s eccentricity in next summer’s wardrobe.

Written by Victoria Rodrigues,

Contributor

Photography by Kavita Babbar

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Milo Maria, SS/17

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Milo Maria, SS/17

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Peter Jensen, SS/17

Peter Jensen, SS/17

Peter Jensen, SS/17

Peter Jensen, SS/17

Peter Jensen, SS/17